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Young Woman Feeding a Parrot

Frans van Mieris (Leiden 1635 – 1681 Leiden)
date
1663
medium
oil on panel
dimensions
22.4 x 17.7 cm
signed information

formerly signed and dated: “F.van Mieris fect Anno 1663”

inventory number
FM-112

Buvelot, Quentin. “Young Woman Feeding a Parrot.” In The Leiden Collection Catalogue. Edited by Arthur K. Wheelock Jr. New York.

https://www.theleidencollection.com/archive/ (accessed August 16, 2018).

This page is available on the site’s Archive. PDF of every version of this page is available on the Archive, and the Archive is managed by a permanent URL. Archival copies will never be deleted. New versions are added only when a substantive change to the narrative occurs.

Print

Frans van Mieris’s fame derives from his interior genre scenes depicting the daily affairs of wealthy Dutch citizens. Many of these paintings consist of two people interacting with each other in some idle fashion, but, as in this stunning painting, he also portrayed single figures relaxing within their domestic spheres. Here, within this darkened room, a richly dressed young woman with a fashionable hairstyle has just interrupted her needlework—a needle cushion is on her lap and a thimble is on one of her fingers—to feed the tame gray parrot sitting on one of the perches of a fine wooden stand.

Parrots were kept as pets in the seventeenth century, and Van Mieris depicted them on other occasions in his genre scenes. He may have painted this exotic bird, a Psittacus eritachus, for no other reason than to emphasize the luxurious surroundings. Notably, though, in images of the Virgin Mary and in marriage portraits, parrots often alluded to virtuousness or marital chastity. The parrot has also been interpreted as a symbol of eloquence and eagerness to learn, because the brightly colored bird can be tamed and taught to mimic speech. This, in any case, is the creature’s apparent role in a print in Jacob Cats’s Houwelyck (Marriage) from 1625, in which a woman represents “Leer-sucht” (eagerness to learn) with an embroidery frame and a squawking parrot on her hand (). The needlework of the woman in Van Mieris’s painting, which can be construed as an allusion to industry and virtue, similarly underscores the parrot’s symbolic meaning. The bird probably denotes the good upbringing of the woman, who bears a striking resemblance to the painter’s wife, Cunera van der Cock (see FM-107). A similar interpretation may be applied to other works that include this motif, such as the painting by Gabriel Metsu discussed below, in which a woman is shown still working on her needlework with the parrot perched on top of a cage.

This well-preserved masterpiece shows the artist’s marvelous technique to great advantage, for in this smoothly executed and precise image Van Mieris achieved a perfect rendering of textures. One is almost inclined to touch the painting and feel the fabric of the woman’s expensive clothes made of shimmering satin, velvet and fur. The sheen of light on the red velvet is handled as sharp white lines and veils of white. Van Mieris’s small scenes were not intended to be viewed from a distance, but even up close, the paint of the woman’s face is so finely blended that the artist’s brushstrokes remain invisible to the eye. In order to produce such a refined painting, Van Mieris must have applied layer after layer, in both the underpainting and in the final paint.

The painting was formerly signed in full and dated “1663,” but the signature and date disappeared during a cleaning in 2009, a not uncommon phenomenon with Van Mieris’s paintings. An unsigned work in London (), painted on a copperplate and of slightly lesser quality, has traditionally been regarded as an autograph replica of this panel painting. After the two works were shown side by side in an exhibition at the National Gallery in London in 2010, however, subtle differences were noted in the way textures of materials were rendered, which seems to indicate that the London version was made by another painter working in Van Mieris’s studio. Little is known about how his studio was actually organized, so even the very question of whether Van Mieris made autograph replicas remains unresolved.

The London painting and more than two dozen copies made after Young Woman Feeding a Parrot attest to the great popularity of this small masterpiece. The composition must also have made a great impact on fellow painters. Van Mieris’s famous teacher Gerrit Dou (1613–75), for example, depicted the subject of a woman with a parrot probably only after his pupil had finished the present painting (see GD-105). Van Mieris’s paintings also inspired many of his contemporaries, including Johannes Vermeer (1632–75) and Gabriel Metsu (1629–67). The latter artist’s Woman Sewing, with a Parrot () is so similar to Young Woman Feeding a Parrot that it is very likely that Metsu tried to emulate Van Mieris’s work even as he translated Van Mieris’s painting technique into his own visual vocabulary.

Young Woman Feeding a Parrot was formerly one of the highlights of the paintings collection of the Bavarian Electors. It had probably been acquired by Elector Maximilian II Emanuel of Bavaria (1662–1726). As of 1836, it was exhibited in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, the paintings by Van Mieris and other fijnschilders such as Gerrit Dou gradually fell from favor. Ironically, this rejection of their work was based on the same qualities that had attracted such admiration in the beginning, namely, their refined brushstrokes. In the nineteenth century, the view had gradually taken hold that a painter’s work must display his distinctive hand. The precise imitation of reality was seen less and less as an artistic virtue; on the contrary, it was considered a reprehensible “trick,” certainly after the advent of photography. With this shift, art was viewed and valued increasingly in terms of expression.

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–69) and Frans Hals (1582/83–1666) became Dutch national symbols after their “rediscovery” by the French art critic Étienne-Joseph-Théophile Thoré (1807–69), who published under the pseudonym Willem Bürger. Their loosely painted works formed a major source of inspiration for impressionists and others, whereas the work of the fijnschilders lost its influence. In the 1920s and 1930s this reversal in appreciation eventually led some German museums to deaccession numerous works by the fijnschilders, including Young Woman Feeding a Parrot, which was sold in 1936. After World War II the painting entered the collection of Charles Dunlap of Philadelphia. When his widow sold the work at auction in 1975, the painting became part of the collection of Lord Harold Samuel (1912–87), who eventually bequeathed most of his collection to the City of London to be placed in Mansion House. Only a few paintings, including the present one, were not part of this bequest. In December 2008, Van Mieris’s masterpiece was sold at a public auction, and shortly thereafter it was acquired for the Leiden Collection.

- Quentin Buvelot
2017
  • The Collection of the Bavarian Electors, Schloss Schleißheim, Oberschleißheim, probably acquired by Elector Maximilian II Emanuel of Bavaria (1662–1726), before 1726; by descent to Charles VII Albert (1697–1745), 1726–45; by descent to the Bavarian Electoral and Royal Collection (Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen) in the following locations: Schloss Schleißheim, 1748–75; Hofgartengalerie, Munich, by 1783; Alte Pinakothek, Munich, 1836–1923; Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Speyer, 1923–36 [D. A. Hoogendijk, Amsterdam, 19 August 1936].
  • Mr. and Mrs. David Birnbaum, who later changed their name to Bingham, New York, by 1942 and until at least 1945.
  • Mr. Charles E. Dunlap (1889–1966), Philadelphia, probably by 1945; by descent to Mrs. Charles Dunlap, New York (her sale, Sotheby’s Parke Bernet, New York, 3 December 1975, no. 304 [Edward Speelman for Lord Harold Samuel for $155,000]).
  • Lord Harold Samuel (1912–87), Wych Cross Place, Sussex, England, 1975–87; by descent to Lady Samuel of Wych Cross (sale, Sotheby’s, London, 5 December 2008, no. 25 [Johnny van Haeften, Ltd., London]).
  • From whom acquired by the present owner.
  • New York, Duveen Galleries, “Paintings by the Great Dutch Masters of the Seventeenth Century: Loan Exhibition in Aid of the Queen Wilhelmina Fund and the American Women’s Voluntary Services,” 8 October–7 November 1942, no. 34.
  • Montreal, Art Association of Montreal, “Loan Exhibition of Great Paintings: Five Centuries of Dutch Art,” 9 March–9 April 1944, no. 85.
  • New York, M. Knoedler & Co., “Dutch Masters of the Seventeenth Century,” 5–24 February 1945, no. 9.
  • London, National Gallery, “Close Examination: Fakes, Mistakes, and Discoveries,” 30 June–12 September 2010 [lent by the present owner].
  • New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, on loan with the permanent collection, September 2009–June 2010 [lent by the present owner].
  • Washington D.C., National Gallery of Art, on loan with the permanent collection, December 2010 – December 2011 [lent by the present owner].
  • Rome, Scuderie del Quirinale, “Vermeer: Il secolo d’oro dell’arte olandese,” 20 September 2012–13 January 2013, no. 32 [lent by the present owner].
  • Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, on loan with the permanent collection, April 2013–April 2015 [lent by the present owner].
  • Paris, Musée du Louvre, “Vermeer et les maîtres de la peinture de genre / Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry,” 20 February–22 May 2017; Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland, 17 June–17 September 2017; Washington, National Gallery of Art, 22 October–21 January 2018 [lent by the present owner].
  • Moscow, The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, “The Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer: Masterpieces from The Leiden Collection,” 28 March 2018–22 July 2018 [lent by the present owner].
  • Inventories of Schloss Schleißheim. Schleißheim, 1748 and 1775, no. 677.
  • Die Bildergallerie in München. Munich, 1787, no. 628.
  • Mannlich, Christian von.  Beschreibung der Churpfalzbaierischen Gemälde-Sammlungen.  2 vols.  Munich, 1805, 2:266, no. 1087.
  • Smith, John. A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch, Flemish and French Painters.  9 vols.  London, 1829–42, 1:70, in no. 29.
  • Von Dillis, Georg.  Verzeichnis der Gemälde in der königlichen Pinakothek zu München.  Munich, 1838, 202, no. 188.
  • Nagler, Georg Kasper. Neues allgemeines Küstler-Lexikon oder Nachrichten von dem Leben und den Werken der Maler, Bildhauer, Baumeister, Kupferstecher, Formschneider, Lithographen, Zeichner, Medailleure, Elfenbeinarbeiter, etc. 22 vols. Munich, 1835–52, 9:266.
  • Siret, Adolphe.  Dictionnaire historique des Peintres de toutes les écoles.  Brussels, 1848, 127.
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  • Parthey, Gustav. Deutscher Bildersaal: Verzeichnis der in Deutschland vorhandenen Oelbilder verstorbener Maler aller Schulen.  4 vols.  Berlin, 1863, 3:129, nos. 38 and 39.
  • Marggraff, Rodolphe.  Catalogue des tableaux de l’ancienne Pinacothèque Royale à Munich.  Munich, 1866, 206, no. 417.
  • Crowe, Joseph Arthur.  The Handbook of Painting: The German, Flemish and Dutch Schools, based on the Handbook of Kugler.  2 vols.  London, 1874, 2:409.
  • Lemcke, Carl.  “Frans van Mieris.”  In Kunst und Künstler des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit. Biographien und charakteristiken unter mitwirkung von fachgenossen herausgegeben von Dr. R. Dohme. Kunst und Kunstler Deutschlands und er Niederlände bis um die Mitte des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts. Edited by Robert Dohme, 2:23. 2 vols.  Leipizig, 1878.
  • Gower, Robert.  The Figure Painters of Holland.  London, 1880, 113, 114.
  • Katalog der Gemälde-Sammlung der Kgl. Älteren Pinakothek in München. Mit einer historischen Einleitung von Dr. Franz von Reber.  Munich, 1884, 88, no. 414. (Reprinted in 1888, 1891, 1898, 1901, 1904, 1908, 1911, 1913.)
  • Champlin, John Denison, and Charles C. Perkins, eds. Cyclopedia of Painters and Paintings. 3 vols. New York, 1887, 3:265.
  • Von Wurzbach, Alfred.  Niederländisches Künstler-Lexikon:Auf Grund Archivalischer      Forschungen Bearbeitet. 3 vols. Vienna and Liepzig, 1906–11, 2:165.
  • Katalog der Älteren Pinakothek zu München: Amtliche Ausgabe.  Munich, 1920, 96, no. 533.  (Reprinted in 1922, 1925, and 1928.)
  • Graeff, Walter, ed.  Katalog der Staatsgemäldesammlung in Speyer: Amtliche Ausgabe. Munich, 1927, 58, no. 533.
  • Williamson, George C., ed. Bryan’s Dictionary of Painters and Engravers. 5 vols. London, 1927, 3:337.
  • Hofstede de Groot, Cornelis. A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch Painters of the Seventeenth Century Based on the Work of John Smith. Edited and translated by Edward G. Hawke, 10:55, no. 213. 8 vols. London, 1907–28. Originally published as Beschreibendes und kritisches Verzeichnis der Werke der hervorragendsten höllandischen Maler des XVII. Jahrhunderts. 10 vols. Esslingen and Paris, 1907–28.
  • Stechow, Wolfgang.  “Frans van Mieris.”  In Allgemeine Lexikon der bildenden Künstler Antike bis zur Gegenwar. Edited by Ulrich Thieme and Felix Becker, 24:540.  37 vols.  Leipzig, 1907–50.
  • Hourticq, Louis.  Hollande en Histoire Générale de l’Art.  Paris, 1932, 307.
  • Juynboll, Wilhelm R.  “Frans van Mieris.”  Nieuwe Rotterdamse Courant, 14 April 1935: 2.
  • McCall, George Henry, ed.  Paintings by the Great Dutch Masters of the Seventeenth Century:  Loan Exhibition in Aid of the Queen Wilhelmina Fund and the American Women’s Voluntary Services.  Exh. cat. New York, Duveen Galleries. New York, 1942, 126, no. 34.
  • Valentiner, Willem R., ed.  Loan Exhibition of Great Paintings: Five Centuries of Dutch Art.  Exh. cat. Montreal, Art Association of Montreal. Montreal, 1944, no. 85.
  • Dutch Masters of the Seventeenth Century. Exh. cat. New York, M. Knoedler & Co.  New York, 1945, no. 9.
  • Wilenski, Reginald Howard. Dutch Painting. New York, 1955, 29.
  • MacLaren, Neil.  National Gallery Catalogues. The Dutch School. 2 vols.  London, 1960, 1:249.
  • Plietzsch, Eduard.  Holländische und flämische Maler des 17. Jahrhunderts.  Leipzig, 1960, 52.
  • Böttger, Peter.  Die Alte Pinakothek in München.  Mit einem Anhang:  Abdruck des frühesten Gemäldeverzeichnisses der Pinakothek aus dem Jahre 1838 von Georg von Dillis.  Nach den heutigen Invenarnummern identifiziert von Gisela Scheffer.  Munich, 1972, 562.
  • Hadler, Mona.  “Manet’s Woman with a Parrot.” Metropolitan Museum of Art Journal 7 (1973): 119, no. 3.
  • Robinson, Franklin W.  Gabriel Metsu (1629–1667):  A Study of His Place in Dutch Genre Painting of the Golden Age.  New York, 1974, 49, fig 121a.
  • Advertisement. Burlington Magazine 117 (November 1975): lvi.
  • Advertisement. New York Times, 29 (November 1975).
  • Advertisement.  Apollo (November 1975): 132.
  • Naumann, Otto.  “Frans van Mieris as a Draughtsman.” Master Drawings 16 (1978):  20 n. 22, 25.
  • Naumann, Otto.  Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder. 2 vols. Doornspijk, 1981, 1:17, 63, 64, 66–68 (and nn. 12, 23), 124; 2:64–69, no. 54-I.
  • White, Christopher.  The Dutch Pictures in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen.  Cambridge, 1982, 79.
  • Moiso-Diekamp, Cornelia. Das Pendant in der holländischen Malerei des 17. Jahrhunderts.  Frankfurt am Main, 1987, 375–76, no. B3.
  • Sluijter, Eric Jan, Marlies Enklaar, and Paul Nieuwenhuizen, eds. Leidse Fijnschilders: Van Gerrit Dou tot Frans van Mieris de Jonge, 1630–1760.  Exh cat. Leiden, Stedelijk Museum de Lakenhal.  Zwolle, 1988, 66, 253, 255 n. 3, and fig. 49.
  • MacLaren, Neil and Christopher Brown. The Dutch School 1600–1900. National Gallery Catalogues. 2 vols.  London, 1991, 1:262, 263 n. 1; 2: fig. 60.
  • Inaugural Exhibition of Old Master Paintings. Exh cat. New York, Otto Naumann, Ltd. New York, 1995, 121 n. 4.
  • Senenko, Maria, ed.  Holland XVIII–XIX Centuries, Collection of Paintings.  Exh. cat. Moscow, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts.  Moscow, 2000, 231.
  • Bøgh Røberg, Lene, ed.  Twee Gouden Eeuwen: Schilderkunst uit Nederland en Denemarken.  Exh. cat. Copenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst; Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum. Zwolle, 2001, 176.
  • Giltaij, Jeroen, ed.  Senses and Sins: Dutch Painters of Daily Life in the Seventeenth Century.  Exh. cat. Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen; Frankfurt am Main, Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städische Galerie. Ostfildern-Ruit, 2004, 219, 220 n. 1.
  • Buvelot, Quentin, Otto Naumann, and Eddy de Jongh. Frans van Mieris 1635–1681. Edited by Quentin Buvelot, 163, 165, fig. 33a, 234, no. 54-I. Exh. cat. The Hague, Mauritshuis; Washington, National Gallery of Art. Zwolle, 2005.
  • Wieseman, Marjorie.  “A Woman in a Red Jacket Feeding a Parrot.” In Close Examination:  Fakes, Mistakes, and Discoveries.  Exh. website, National Gallery. London, 2010. http://nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/research/a-woman-in-a-red-jacket-feeding-a-parrot.
  • Gifford, E. Melanie. “Fine Painting and Eloquent Imprecision: Gabriel Metsu’s Painting Technique.” In Gabriel Metsu. Edited by Adriaan Waiboer, 176–77 and figs. 138, 140. Exh. cat. Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland; Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum; Washington, National Gallery of Art. New Haven, 2010.
  • Schavemaker, Eddy. Eglon van der Neer (1635/36–1703): His Life and Work. Doornspijk, 2010, 49 n. 8, 53 n. 20.
  • Buvelot, Quentin. “Donna che dà mangiare a un pappagallo” In Johannes Vermeer: Il secolo d’oro dell’arte olandese. Edited by Sandrina Bandera, Walter Liedtke, and Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., 170–71, no. 32.  Exh. cat. Rome, Scuderie del Quirinale. Rome, 2012.
  • Waiboer, Adriaan. Gabriel Metsu, Life and Work: A Catalogue Raisonné. New Haven, 2012, 110 and fig. 39.
  • Buvelot, Quentin. “Has the Great Age of Collecting Dutch Old Master Paintings Come to an End?” In Holland’s Golden Age in America: Collecting the Art of Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hals. Edited by Esmée Quodbach, 190–91, no. 107. New York, 2014.
  • Buvelot, Quentin, and Ariane van Suchtelen. Genre Paintings in the Mauritshuis. Zwolle, 2016, 140, no. 19f.
  • Ducos, Blaise. “Paris – New York – Paris Éliézer et Rébececa au puits de Ferdinand Bol: au don au Louvre.” In Masterpieces of The Leiden Collection: The Age of Rembrandt. Edited by Blaise Ducos and Dominique Surh, 16. Exh. cat. Paris, Musée du Louvre. Paris. 2017.
  • Gifford, E. Melanie and Lisha Deming Glinsman. “Style collectif et manière personelle: Matériaux et techniques dans la peinture de genre.” In Vermeer et les maîtres de la peinture de genre. Edited by Adriaan E. Waiboer, Blaise Ducos, and Arthur K. Wheelock  Jr., 134–36, fig, 62. Exh. cat. Paris, Musée du Louvre; Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland; Washington, National Gallery of Art. Paris, 2017.
  • Waiboer, Adriaan. “Les Perroquets.” In Vermeer et les maîtres de la peinture de genre. Edited by Adriaan E. Waiboer, Blaise Ducos, and Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., 317, 321, cat. no. 50. Exh. cat. Paris, Musée du Louvre, Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland; Washington, National Gallery of Art. Paris, 2017.
  • Gifford, E. Melanie and Lisha Deming Glinsman. “Collective Style and Personal Manner: Materials and Techniques of High-Life Genre Painting.” In Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry. Edited by Adriaan E. Waiboer, Blaise Ducos, and Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., 64–65, 79, fig. 42C. Exh. cat. Paris, Musée du Louvre; Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland; Washington, National Gallery of Art. New Haven and London, 2017.
  • Waiboer, Adriaan. “Birds of a Feather.”  In Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting:   Inspiration and Rivalry. Edited by Adriaan E. Waiboer, Blaise Ducos, and Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., 184, 186–87, 247, cat. 13.2. Exh. cat. Paris, Musée du Louvre; Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland; Washington, National Gallery of Art. New Haven and London, 2017.
  • Ho, Angela K. Creating Distinctions in Dutch Genre Painting. Amsterdam, 2017, 164, fig. 55. [erroneously noted as in a Private Collection, UK].
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  • McCarthy, Alexa. “Young Woman Feeding a Parrot.” In The Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer: Masterpieces of The Leiden Collection. Edited by Polina Lyubimova, 136–37; 238, no. 35. Translated by Daria Babich and Daria Kuzina. Exh. cat. Moscow, The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts; St. Petersburg, The State Hermitage Museum. Moscow, 2018.

The support, a single plank of vertically grained, rectangular-shaped oak, has one bevel along the upper edge. Shims toned black have been glued to all four sides, and the upper and lower shims have been reinforced with brads. A red wax collection seal with no recognizable impression, ten red wax dots, and six paper labels are located along the panel reverse, but there are no import stamps, inscriptions or panel maker’s marks.

A white-colored ground of medium thickness has been evenly applied. The paint has been applied smoothly in thin layers with low brushmarking of transparent glazing, with lighter more opaque tones and highlights ranging from creamy opaque lines to thin light scumbles.

The painting is unsigned and undated; however, an engraving by Ignaz Sebastian Klauber from 1789 indicates the painting was formerly signed and dated “F.van Mieris fect Anno 1663”.

The painting was not examined with infrared. The X-radiograph reveals a compositional change in the lower left corner where a draped cloth-like form was previously located where the parrot’s post now stands.

The painting was cleaned and restored in 2009 and remains in a good state of preservation despite areas of thinness through the brown background, parrot, and figure’s ribbon and hair.

Engraved

  1. Ignaz Sebastian Klauber, after Frans van Mieris, Portrait of Frans van Mieris’s Wife (so-called), 1789, etching and engraving, 29.7 x 25.1 cm (plate from Tableaux, Statues, Bas-Reliefs et Camées, de la Galerie de Florence et du Palais Pitti, vol. 2 [Paris: L. J. Masquelier, 1792]).
  2. Johann Nepomuk Strixner, after Frans van Mieris, Lady Feeding a Parrot, ca. 1819, lithograph, 30 x 25 cm (plate from Königlich-Baierischer Gemälde Saal zu München und Schleissheim: Eine Sammlung ausgezeichneter Gemälde der Pinacothek in München, vol. 1 [Munich, 1821]).
  3. Albert Henry Payne, after Frans van Mieris, Dame & Papagei, ca. 1860, engraving, 19.7 x 26.6 inches (plate from Die Gallerien von München: Eine Stahlstichsammlung der vorzüglichsten Gemälde der Königl. Pinakothek, der Herzogl. Leuchtenberg’schen und Schleisshiemer Gallerien [Leipzig and Dresden, 1853]).
  4. Johann Burger, after Frans van Mieris, Dame mit dem Papagei, 1886, engraving, approx. 29 x 24 cm (plate from Jahrbuch der graphischen Künste, Vervielfaltigende Kunst, Vienna, 1886).

Versions and Copies

  1. Frans van Mieris the Elder, A Woman in a Red Jacket Feeding a Parrot, ca. 1663, oil on copper, 22.5 x 17.3 cm, National Gallery, London, NG840 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:65, no. 54II, probably a second version by the artist).
  2. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 21.7 x 16.2 cm (8 x 6 pouces), previously sale, Choiseul-Praslin, Paris, 18 February 1793, no. 68 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:66, no. 54a).
  3. Circle of Frans van Mieris the Elder, A Lady with Her Parrot, oil on panel, 22.6 x 17.4 cm, Royal Collection Trust, Buckingham Palace, London (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:66, no. 54b, fig. C 54b).
  4. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 22.5 x 16.1 cm (8 ¾ x 6 ¼ duim), previously sale, Johan van der Linden van Slingelandt, Dordrecht, 22 August 1785, no. 263 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:66, no. 54c).
  5. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 20.6 x 15.4 cm (8 x 6 duim), previously anonymous sale, Rotterdam, 6 June 1810, no. 12 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:66, no. 54d, possibly identical with no. II 54c).
  6. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 22.5 x 17.5 cm, formerly Gemäldegalerie, Dresden, from 1751, destroyed during World War II (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:66, no. 54e, fig. C 54e, as possibly by Frans van Mieris the Elder).
  7. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 21.5 x 17.8 cm, formerly Sir Francis Cook and Sir Frederick Cook, Doughty House, Richmond (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54f, fig. C 54f).
  8. After Frans van Mieris, oil on copper, 22.9 x 17.8 cm (9 x 7 in), previously anonymous sale, Christie’s, London, 23 April 1954, no. 38 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54g, fig. C 54g).
  9. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 24.5 x 19.5 cm, previously sale, Albert Lehmann, Paris, 12 June 1925, no. 264 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder. 2 vols. Doornspijk, 1981, 2:67, no. 54h).
  10. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously Shuvalov collection, Leningrad, 1928 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54i).
  11. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously anonymous sale, London, 15 July 1949, no. 16 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54j).
  12. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously sale, Dr. Frank, London, 25 June 1843 [12.12 pounds to Emery] (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54k).
  13. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously sale, Phillips, London, 28 February 1799, no. 41 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54l).
  14. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously sale, Catton, London, 11 March 1802, no. 76 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54m).
  15. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously sale, Stockholm, 12 November 1968, no. 662 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:67, no. 54n).
  16. After Frans van Mieris, materials and dimensions unknown, previously sale, Edwards, London, 25 May 1808, no. 54 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54o).
  17. After Frans van Mieris, materials unknown, 6 ¾ x 8 ½ Zoll., Casino, Koblenz, 1864 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54p).
  18. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 9 x 7 Zoll., Hohenzollern-Hechingen collection, Löwenberg, 1864 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54q).
  19. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 23 x 19.5 cm, City Museum, Alès, no. 43 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54r).
  20. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 36.8 x 29.2 cm, previously sale, Earl of Jersey, London, 15 July 1944, no. 16, as Ter Borch (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54s).
  21. After Frans van Mieris, oil on copper, 57 x 48 cm, previously sale, Zurich, 26 November 1927, no. 162 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54t).
  22. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 22.9 x 23cm, previously sale, Sotheby’s, London, 17 June 1959, no 99 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54u).
  23. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 26 x 21 cm, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Mulhouse, since 1876 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54v).
  24. After Frans van Mieris, oil on canvas, 30 x 25 cm, previously sale, Antwerp, 15 April 1884, no. 70 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54w).
  25. After Frans van Mieris, oil on copper, dimensions unknown, previously with E. Bolton, London, 1926 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54x).
  26. After Frans van Mieris, medium unknown, 17.6 x 13.5 cm, previously sale, Prince de Conti, Paris, 8 April–6 June 1777, no. 410 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:65, no. II 54y).
  27. After Frans van Mieris, oil on panel, 27.5 x 21.5, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, no. 74.a6 (Otto Naumann, Frans van Mieris (1635–1681) the Elder, 2 vols. [Doornspijk, 1981], 2:68, no. 54z).

Drawings

  1. Collection of Eduard von Liphart (sale, Boerner, Leipzig, 26 April 1898, no. 620).
  2. Abraham Delfos (sale, L. van Oukerke, Haarlem, 19 May 1818, Kbk. E., no. 8).
  3. J. F. Schiereeke (sales: Jan Gildemeester, Amsterdam, 24 July 1800, Kbk. N., no. 16; J. Goll van Franckenstein, Amsterdam, 1 August 1833, no. 8; H. de Kat, Rotterdam, 4 March 1867, no. 717).
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